Solo hiking from Abisko to Beisfjord – Part 1

Ever since visiting Abisko in February and snow shoeing into the national park for an afternoon I’ve been thinking it would be interesting to return to the same area in summer.  Over the course of the summer the idea of doing a multi day hike from Abisko through to Brejsford in Norway came to my mind as an excellent potential adventure.

The start of the Kungsleden in Abisko national park.

The start of the Kungsleden in Abisko national park.

This trip had the added appeal of being able to take the night train from Stockholm to Abisko and then from Narvik to Stockholm on the way home.  I enjoy travelling by train as it lets you see the countryside better than in an plane and also allows for some fun abstract long exposure pictures especially if you have an NF filter!

Fjällräven Classic participants near lake Abiskojaure.

Fjällräven Classic participants near lake Abiskojaure.

My plan was to solo hike over five days and four nights from Abisko to Beisfjord and then to recover for a day or two in Narvik before getting the train back home.  I was happy to find that my hiking pack (Osprey Aether 60) was sufficient to the task of carrying my gear, clothes and food for five days.  Although I did leave the bigger cameras at home and just took my Sony RX100 and most compact Gitzo Tripod.

Start of day two, looking back.

Start of day two, looking back.

The first day started late due to the night train getting delayed for a few hours by a signal fault, so I eventually made it to Abiskojaure campsite at 2200 in the evening.  To my dismay I found the campsite already full due to the Fjällräven Classic event that was running along the Kungsleden.  So I hiked a few more kilometres along my planned route and wild camped outside the park for the night in the woods.

Morning break, day two.

Morning break, day two.

My extra hiking the night before meant I had a shorter day ahead of me, the day started sunny but got more cloudy over the afternoon with the odd shower developing.  The trail stayed near the river mostly in light forest, at one point I passed through an empty village of what I assume are winter huts which was an quite eerie experience.  I decided to camp earlier than planned when I came across a good campsite near the last fjord of the day.

Ghostly cabins..

Ghostly cabins..

The early campsite turned out to be a good call as just as I finished setting up the tent it started raining and didn’t stop for the next fourteen hours!  The rain was a pain as I didn’t get a chance to get changed or get my mattress inflated before I got in the tent.  So I was wet, tired and fell asleep on the tent floor.  I woke shivering which was startling as I usually don’t get cold and as it was still raining had to try to inflate an air mattress inside the tent, then get changed into dry cloths and eat some cold food.

The night wasn’t the most peaceful as the heavy rain and my tents pitching meant I was getting some water pooling on top and a little dripping inside.  This concerned me as my sleeping bag is down filled and down doesn’t work well as an insulator once its wet!  Thankfully the drip never got bad enough to soak the bag but I still had a restless nights sleep.

Warden's hut at Unna Allakas.

Warden’s hut at Unna Allakas.

The next day I broke camp after getting some warm breakfast and coffee, as the sky was looking dark and brooding I decided to stop in Unna Allakas (a Swedish mountain hut) that was 5km down my route and ask the warden about the weather forecast.  Shortly after starting hiking the rain started again and I was pretty soaked by the time I reached the hut.

The hut warden Anna told me the forecast was meant to be a bit better for tomorrow so I decided to deviate from my plan and spend the whole day and night in the hut drying out my gear.  This would mean having a longer day for the final two days of my trip but watching the weather from inside the hut I didn’t regret my choice at all!  As hiking in those showers and camping with wet gear would have been fairly miserable experience!

To be continued..

The Return of the Compact Camera

I used to have a Canon S100 but I gave it to a friend at the start of the year as I’d hardly used it for a while.  Over the summer though I again started to feel the need for a compact pocketable camera that I can take with me everywhere.  The trip to Scotland and Copenhagen reinforced this as I carried my X-E2 the whole time but didn’t actually use it more than a few times..

The Sony DSC-RX100 is an amazing little camera.

The Sony DSC-RX100 is an amazing little camera.

So when I returned to Stockholm I started looking at compact camera options with RAW support, manual controls, small size and decent image quality.  I ended up choosing a Sony RX100 as it had all of my desired features (except a built in ND filter) and was pretty cheap due to the third version being recently released.  The massive 1″ sensor, F1.8 Zeiss lens and metal construction make for a very competent little camera.

The Really Right Stuff camera plate I had for my S100 even fits the RX100 too, although it does block access to the memory card and battery compartment.  This isn’t a huge issue as the RX100 charges the battery in the camera via USB which means I can charge it with an USB external battery pack and I don’t need to carry ‘yet another’ charger with me.

Copenhagen for a day

During my January visit to Copenhagen I had thought it would be really good to come back in the summer time but I hadn’t made an plans to do so. However on my way back from visiting family in Scotland there was a airport mistake that meant I could spend a day in Copenhagen!

Nyhavn Tour Boat

This was a blessing, although it did mean carrying around my carry on luggage and duty free for the whole day in 28C heat with 94% humidity! The humidity was the reason I’d opted to go into the city centre instead of waiting in the airport as the airport is very modern (i.e mostly glass) and not made to cope with such extreme humidity!

Nyhavn Canal I

The centre of Copenhagen isn’t made for that sort of heat either but at least you can get outside easily. I even saw some people swimming in the city centre to cool down which seemed like a great idea if I’d had my swimming trunks!

Nyhavn Canal II

It truly is a beautiful city and I was so pleased to be able to see it in the summer time. Nyhavn in particular was very different from my winter visit and I got some photos I’m pretty happy with from there. Not to mention a nice cold beer from a street vendor, got to love Denmark!

My baggage was even waiting for my in Stockholm when I arrived.

Rödlöga

Rödlöga is the further island in the archipelago that can be reached by public transport, its also tiny and without running electricity so its a bit more relaxed than some of the other islands in the archipelago.  My plan was to camp on the south east corner which was the least populated and spend a night. As I was only going for a night I took my pop up grill (BBQ) and a few Coronas as I had the pack space for luxuries!

Rödlöga BBQ by the water.

Rödlöga BBQ by the water.

Again I was very thankful that my tent was self supported as I ended up camped on a granite shelf six feet from the shore line. This isn’t as crazy as it sounds as the sea state in the archipelago is very calm and the tidal range is tiny. My campsite also had the advantage of being ringed by wild strawberries, so I spent quite a bit of time harvesting those during my stay.

Freshwater pool on Rödlöga.

Freshwater pool on Rödlöga.

Sadly the clouds didn’t behave and I didn’t quite get the sunset pictures I’d been hoping for. I did get a few interesting shots of the shore line and even a few abstract panning shots too. In the morning I tried making some long exposure self portraits on the shore line, although with the sea being so calm I really didn’t get the effect I’d been hoping for!

Rödlöga sunset.

Rödlöga sunset.

In the morning I chose to walk back through the woods on an alternate path to the boat instead of back tracking to the path I’d taken the day before. This lead to a bit of a magical mystery tour as the woods prevented navigation by landmarks and the island is so small that there isn’ allot of detail on the map either!

Long exposure self portrait.

Long exposure self portrait.

Thankfully the island is tiny so its hard to be disoriented for any length of time, so I still made it to the jetty in plenty of time for the boat back to Stockholm.

Utö & Ålö Camping

Having just acquired a real hiking bag (Osprey Aether, 60l) to replace my trusty climbing pack (Lowe Pro, 45l) for camping trips I was keen to try two nights out in the archipelago now I had the carrying capacity for it. Most of the pack weight when camping in the archipelago actually tends to be water, as you can’t drink the water you find in the archipelago so you have to carry it in yourself!

Utö campsite inside the firing range.

Utö campsite inside the firing range.

For this trip I chose the islands of Utö and Ålö in the southern archipelago, Utö is another military island with a large portion of it taken up by various firing ranges. My plan was to camp at the tip of the peninsula in the firing range, this isn’t as crazy as it sounds as the range is only closed to the public when its in use. The walk from the boat was pleasant enough and to get to my chosen camping location I had to again follow a compass bearing off the path through the woods to hit the point.

Utö sunset.

Utö sunset.

 

The campsite was even rougher ground than I expected, with the only flat ground I could find being a granite shelf! Thankfully my tent is self supported so I could pitch it on the shelf and weigh it down with rocks. My biggest concern was making sure I’d throughly swept the spent bullet casings and links from where I was pitching the tent as they were pretty sharp and would have probably cut the tent bottom even through the extra groundsheet I’d brought with me.

Utö morning mist.

Utö morning mist.

This campsite proved to be very peaceful despite its normal martial purpose and I got a few good shots during the evening and then the next morning in the light fog. I started the next day with a swim as it was quite hot, I had to resort to the traditional Scottish approach of jumping in as otherwise I was going to chicken out due to the cool water.

Ålö campsite.

Ålö campsite.

After the swim and some breakfast it was time for the walk south to Ålö, I did stop at the big sandy beaches on the south east side of Ålö for a break. After the break I walked to the big beach at the south east of Ålö, I managed to overshot the beach when trying to skirt it the east and popped up in the nudist end by accident!

Ålö abstract I

Ålö abstract I

After swiftly extracting myself to the normal part of the beach I found it was too crowded for my tastes! So after some internal debate I shouldered my pack and wandered up the east coast of Ålö looking for a new campsite. I got lucky and found a nice little cove with an official campfire pit (Ålö is a nature reserve so fires are only allowed in designated spots).

Ålö abstract II.

Ålö abstract II.

The cove itself was a bit too dark to easily photograph (too much dynamic range) but the rocks on the shore where a great place to take some abstract panning shots and a few self portraits of my shadow..

Gardsvik Camping

My second wild camping trip was on Midsummer to the northern archipelago to a little point near the village of Gradsvik. On the satellite image I thought my campsite was a little beach but it turned out to be sand coloured rock instead! Another unexpected factor was the proximity to the village meant the speed boat traffic was significantly higher than I expected, so not quite the solitude I’d hoped for.

Gardsvik shoreline felt more like a lake than the sea.

Gardsvik shoreline felt more like a lake than the sea.

I followed my pattern from the previous trip of getting setup, having a brew then going for a swim (more of a wade this time, cold!) and then getting a camp fire going. After this I made dinner and waited to see what the light and sky would do, as it was overcast.

Gardsvik twilight waiting for the sky to clear.

Gardsvik twilight waiting for the sky to clear.

The sky never really cleared up sadly but I did manage to get a few interesting pictures while I worked over the scenery around my campsite. The coastline was quite different from Musko instead of a rocky shoreline it looked much more like a lakeside, probably due to it being allot more sheltered.

Gardsvik dusk.

Gardsvik dusk.

I did manage to get a good self portrait with the campfire in the foreground and myself in the background. The most fun part was this was about 2330 at night, so it did should just how bright it can be here at night in the summer time!